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Charity gives a lift to Linden Lodge

Patients at Linden Lodge Neurological Rehabilitation Unit are recovering from major trauma and other serious neurological illnesses with help from ten new adjustable height plinths bought with £12,500 funding from Nottingham Hospitals Charity.

The charity has funded four wide plinths, five narrow ones, and a tilt table for the Linden Lodge gym used by patients during their rehabilitation. The unit on the City Hospital campus treats patients following major trauma and for other neurological conditions.

Mark Doran, 46, from Newthorpe, Nottingham has been at Linden Lodge for four months after a toxic reaction to medication caused organ failure and nerve damage. He spent a whole month in an induced coma before coming to the unit.  Mark puts the plinths to good use during daily intensive physio sessions.

He says: “The treatment here has been brilliant. I can’t believe how I have come on. When I first came in I could hardly move my legs. Now I’m walking with the aid of splints.”

Mark is going home next week but will return regularly for treatment. He is hopeful for 80 or 90 per cent improvement if not a full recovery.

Malcolm Holmes, 80, from Eastwood, came to the unit eight weeks ago after an operation to remove a tumour on his spine. Malcolm also uses the plinths in his daily exercise regime to improve his balance and help him learn to walk.

“I use two plinths at the same height. I couldn’t manage without them. I have one hour a day of physio and exercises to do as well. I am confident that I will be able to walk again.”

Sue Pateman, who came to Linden Lodge in early June following major trauma after falling off a horse says: “The plinths are absolutely brilliant. I use them for relaxation and for doing various exercises in my physio sessions. They are nice and firm so it is easier to exercise on them than on a bed. They really are fantastic.”

Clare Donnellan, Clinical Lead Physio says the plinths, delivered last month, are an improvement on equipment previously used as they are more adaptable to patients’ needs. “These are so much better than the ones we had before. Having the narrow ones means we can treat patients in their rooms and we can set someone up safely with two plinths so they can practice exercises on their own.

“We’re very grateful to Nottingham Hospitals Charity for funding these plinths, they make such a difference.”

Other items the Charity has funded for Linden Lodge include activity boxes, MP3 players and portable DVD players. These help stimulate memory for patients with brain injuries as well as enhancing mood and providing different leisure options for patients during their recovery.

Staff at the unit have been active fund-raisers for the Charity too. They raised £2,000 in the Dragon Boat race earlier this year, scooping the prize for best fancy dress. Now staff and patients are taking part in the Ride to Rio challenge, in which between them they cycle 5,804 miles – the distance from Nottingham to Rio – by the end of the Olympics. Patients doing their rehab exercises on an exercise bike and staff cycling to work are all contributing to the challenge in which they aim to raise £1,000 to fund a safe, accessible garden for patients.

Also raising funds for the specialist unit are staff at Nottingham insurance company Russell Scanlan, who have chosen Linden Lodge as their Charity of the year, inspired by the experience of one of their personnel whose husband was treated at the unit last year. Jonathan Hale, husband of the company’s Accounts Administrator Rebecca Hale, raised £1,934 for Linden Lodge in a sponsored sky dive just 12 months after he was himself treated there. His efforts will be supported by other fundraising activity among staff throughout the year.

Bryan Banbury Managing Director Russell Scanlan Ltd says: “We have chosen Linden Lodge Neurological Unity in Nottingham as our charity of the year as we have seen first-hand how much Linden Lodge makes a positive difference to the community we live in and the rehabilitation they offer there is second to none.”


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